You Are How You Eat…Wait. What?

Far be it from me to tell anyone how to eat, much less what to eat. But, when you witness eating habits every day with those you live and work with, you might have questions. I mean this in the most humorous sense possible, but what’s with people (my fiancé) eating one item at a time on their plate? 

I’ll lay it out for you…

On a plate I place some chicken, potatoes, Brussels sprouts, and corn.  He rotates his plate and eats each item—in it’s entirety—before moving on to the next. Hamburger and fries? He eats ALL of the fries first, then the hamburger. Fried eggs, hash browns, bacon, and toast? This is where he might mix it up and lay the fried egg over the hash browns—eat all of it—then eat the bacon, and finally the toast. Who eats toast by itself? You’re supposed to dip it in the egg-juice! Right?

It truly doesn’t bother me, but I wonder if a person isn’t missing out on some delicious combo-flavors when eating items separately. I’m not talking about a picky eater or about not allowing food on the plate to touch one another. If I make enchiladas with rice and refried beans—all are eaten one at a time. Me? I am taking bites of enchilada, quickly followed by the duo of rice and beans…and guacamole…and a chip or two. Am I a beast? Maybe. 

This is more of a curiosity for me, I guess. It’s just so hard to process and my stating they taste better together is met with, “Oh, okay,”—and then still eaten separate. Yes, it does allow for one to appreciate the taste and flavor of the individual items. But don’t you know the magic that happens when they are combined? 

Am I wrong?

I came across this article that breaks down the personalities based on how a person eats. Someone like me, for example, who is labeled a “mixer” by combining the food on their plate—is outgoing and friendly. It goes on to say this person’s overeagerness to multitask “can exhaust them and make them lose track of deadlines.” Yea, this is so me.

For the one food item at a time person, they are detail-oriented and like to think things through. “They see details everyone misses.” It also states “they should be patient with others who don’t follow the same strategy.” Well, that problem is solved as this describes my fiancé rather well. 


There are many other types, such as:


The slow-eater who enjoys every moment and in no hurry in life.

The fast-eater who is good at multitasking, but may miss out on some things in life.

The picky eater who stay in their comfort zone and doesn’t take risks.

The adventurer who takes risks and not afraid to fail.

The one who always wants a bite of your food can be a bit possessive and demanding.

Again, this isn’t something that bothers me so much as I wonder what’s going on in their head. Eating is something we all do and without giving thought to how. I never considered it an extension of our personality. In our house, we also have a slow eater, fast eater, and picky eater—all of which fits who they are, even if there is a bit of crossovers here and there.

What about you? Where do you fall in the eating category? 

Confessions of a Culinary Autocrat

Hello. My name is Desiree and I’m a Culinary Autocrat.

Let’s first define autocrat as I know it’s one of those words people think they know, but may not be sure. The purpose of this exercise is to bring awareness, as well as help those who are in denial to recognize it within themselves. 

Autocrat:  a person ruling with unlimited authority; one who has undisputed influence or power.

It took a hot minute to determine the exact noun I wanted to use to describe my condition. I first selected bully, but that is defined as someone who is habitually cruel, insulting, or threatening to others who are weaker or in some way vulnerable. I am not cruel, insulting, or remotely threatening to anyone—it’s not in my nature. Dictator didn’t work as I’m not an oppressor—unless you ask any one of my kids, but that’s for another time. These two words alone are quite negative in connotation and I don’t think my condition warrants that kind of cynicism. 

The word autocrat seemed to fit perfectly as I do have unlimited authority in my kitchen and hold all of the power and influence as to what goes on there. Think of a chef in a restaurant. This person is in charge and decides on what is to be prepared and how. I am no different in my kitchen, but the concept changes when people around you aren’t employees. With that, I am using this post as a sort of confessional as I recognize that my autocratical ways may not always be positive. 

Herein lies my problem…I like things prepared or cooked in a certain way—my way. My argument is that I have been cooking for about twenty-five years and I think that gives me some authority. Right? I know I have made it far from fun to cook with me sometimes—okay, most of the time—but, there are methods to my madness. There are certain ways things are to be chopped, or diced, and there are specific ways ingredients have to be measured and prepared (see Alton Brown). There’s a science to the art of cooking and it ALWAYS matters how things are done.

I am confident in my abilities and know my limitations. I know I should use my powers for good and teach my teenagers, but I lose patience. I can show them how to use a knife, measure ingredients, and put everything together. The problem is that the next time they help, anything I’ve taught has vanished from their memory. I show them again—and again—and again. To watch them haphazardly pour milk into a measuring cup used for dry ingredients EVERY SINGLE TIME, rather than use one for liquids, makes me crazy.  Now I am done and my tone will discourage them from any future culinary exercises. However, I do need to ensure my kids know how to cook for themselves as they have to be comfortable in the kitchen, knowing all the tools to use, spices to add, and various ingredients that work well together.  Or, they grow up thinking it’s easier to open a box and just add water…with the wrong measuring cup, no less.

Now, cooking with your significant other not only shares responsibilities, but it’s an engaging way to bring you closer together. There are random conversations, laughter, and even some sensual taste-testing.  Michael and I have had some fabulous cooking sessions and it can, quite honestly, be very romantic. However, the days of us preparing meals together have been put on the back shelf—like some ingredient that is used on rare occasions, such as truffle oil or saffron. He knows how to cook and has prepared some delicious meals.  I have learned with him that I have to let go and let him prepare things as he wants. However, I find myself making little comments—not to insult but to suggest. At least that’s how I see it.

Now, cooking with your significant other not only shares responsibilities, but it’s an engaging way to bring you closer together. There are random conversations, laughter, and even some sensual taste-testing.  Michael and I have had some fabulous cooking sessions and it can, quite honestly, be very romantic. However, the days of us preparing meals together have been put on the back shelf—like some ingredient that is used on rare occasions, such as truffle oil or saffron. He knows how to cook and has prepared some delicious meals.  I have learned with him that I have to let go and let him prepare things as he wants. However, I find myself making little comments—not to insult but to suggest. At least that’s how I see it.

Things all came to head when he wanted to help and asked how I wanted some potatoes cut. They were going to be roasted in the oven, so it was important that they were all relatively the same in bite-size pieces to cook evenly. What started as a friendly argument over diced versus chopped turned into eerie silence in the kitchen.  I’m honestly not sure it was me being offensive or him being defensive—but, it’s been a while just the same. 

So, I find myself alone in the kitchen these days and I know it’s my fault. I have to let go my need to be in culinary control and allow my family to learn—just as I did (and still do). With Michael, I have to let him cook as he pleases, without my commentary (unless he asks, of course). I will add that I don’t complain about having to do all the cooking—the culinary autocrat in me is good with this. But, the kitchen being the most commonly used room in the house is a meeting place for families. I am exceedingly happy on those rare occasions everyone is home and standing around the counter as I cook—laughing and sharing stories. I even love it when just one person hangs out with me—until they ask to help.

I’m a work in progress. 

If Being Snarky Was A Calorie Burner…

I have been basking in the glow of my 25 pound loss this past week—up until this morning. I feel a tad bit grouchy and disappointed with the scale that obviously isn’t getting on board with reaching my new weight goal. The clever chart on my app that monitors my progress for the month looks like a cardiogram. I know better having done all the work to get from 160 to 135 pounds. There were times when the scale seemed to be malfunctioning and I had to check the battery, and maybe give it a kick or two. My weight seems to fluctuate for a period of time, thus resulting in my attitude being quite snarky. 

During these times, I behave as if I don’t care anymore about the weight loss—and not in a good way. I say a lot of bad words (to the scale, mostly) and unsuccessfully not take it out on those around me. Not mature, I know—however, I never claimed to be. What I don’t do is brush off my healthy eating habits or go out and get my favorite ice cream—Bluebell’s Pistachio, laden with an inappropriate amount of Hershey’s chocolate syrup. I treat the day as any other and measure out the food portions, log everything I eat in my app, and keep my body moving. You know, kind of like your teenager having to do chores while mumbling under her breath how much she hates you. 

And, just like clockwork, four to five, or maybe even six days later, I’m down another pound toward my goal. It’s all rainbows and butterflies and I’m skipping in the sunshine—life is perfect. Then, I have some fences to mend around the house as my family seems to be a bit hesitant to engage. So maybe yes, I do get rather snarky. I did it this morning when Michael suggested I get my body moving more. I know he’s trying to help and has only my best interest at heart. 

What he said: “You should think about adding more exercise to help burn off some of the weight you want to lose. Get your heart rate up with some cardio.” 

What I heard was: “If you get off your ass more and exercise, perhaps you’ll lose the weight.”

I even added something along the line of “Yea, I’ll run a marathon and probably lose nothing.” I was on the offensive and there was no reason to be as he knows that I’m actively working toward my goals. I’m just not actively exercising as much as I should if I want better results. I do know that snarky, negative comments do nothing for my weight loss.

But, oh if they did…

Too Many Books in the Kitchen

As a book lover, I believe you can never have too many books—hoarder or not. In the genre of cooking, I’m wondering if my collection has become somewhat excessive (or is it obsessive?). In the quest for healthy eating, I spend an enormous amount of time flipping through cookbooks looking for new recipes. The problem is everything looks so delicious! I have been successful in creating a menu for a week’s worth of meals twice in the past few months. Those other weeks, the menu looks like an editor took to my work and hated everything. I’m constantly changing my mind because there’s something that pops up that looks better than what I’ve planned. 

The cookbook I have turned to most is Milk Street’s Tuesday Nights and it’s fantastic. I’m not sure how many recipes are in there, but I think I’ve covered at least a third of them so far this past month. When we brought it home, we sat down and turned each page, marking the ones we wanted to try—green tabs for him and orange for me. Yes, we are nerds—chef nerds. What I love is that there is no set category, i.e. American, French, Italian, etc. I made a Palestinian Crispy Herb Omelet for breakfast and Chicken in Chipotle Sauce for dinner (they actually used pork chops in the book, but I’m shifty like that). 

Now, this doesn’t include the ten other cookbooks on my counter (eight in the cabinet), magazines in the drawer, and internet websites I use. I love to cook, so all of this is stimulating for me. The only anxiety I feel is waiting for Michael to take that first bite. If I don’t hear any words come out of his mouth and he continues eating, I’ve done well. If he says, “Interesting,” then it can go either way. If he literally licks the plate, then the recipe gets a gold star. He’s a trooper and will eat absolutely anything I put in front of him. The only exception is when chicken breast is in any way soft—it has to be thin and firm. I’ve learned this, so I don’t make that mistake anymore. It makes me feel like I’ve failed all humanity when food gets put in the trash. He never makes me feel bad as he knows it’s his personal preference—but, a little bit of my soul dies like any other chef who disappoints. 

The essential element to any purchased cookbook is that the ingredients are attainable. I’m a frugal shopper as it is and already go to three different grocery stores each week—yes, three. One is a local farmer’s market with a large variety of fruits and vegetables on one side; and meats, poultry, and seafood on the other. The second is a regular grocery store for all the ancillary items like seasonings, oils, dairy, paper products, etc. The third is a specialty store similar to Whole Foods, called Lucky’s Market. If I want garam marsala, tamarind paste, or some unique organic item—they have it. I also love that I can get red or green lentils, sesame seeds, coconut flour—or whatever they have in a snazzy dispenser—by the ounce or pound. 

If the book’s recipes call for some weird ingredient like hunza apricots, kiwano (it’s a thing), or tears of a mountain goat—it doesn’t come home. And, I don’t order food from the internet. Call it old fashioned, but that’s unnatural to me. I welcome any persuasive arguments you have to convince me otherwise.

The bonus to all of this is having made some sensational and delicious discoveries for my food palate. Most of my meals before we started eating healthier consisted of Mexican food or something breaded and fried. Mexican food hasn’t gone anywhere, it’s just made healthier now (if only in my mind). But, I’ve discovered I like turmeric, curry, and even tofu—among many other flavors and textures. I continue to dislike thyme in any form or fashion. If the recipe calls for any amount of it, I’m only putting 1/8 of a teaspoon…maybe. 

I do think having a variety is key to keeping your diet fun and interesting. Our daughter refers to all of our meals as being rabbit food, but healthy isn’t just about salads and fruits. It’s making dishes with fresh ingredients and being smart about how they’re prepared. Michael had a southern craving for fried green tomatoes and being the good guru of a chef that I am, I made baked green tomatoes. Not only were they delicious, but had a better crunch than the fried variety. Mix up a little avocado oil mayo, yogurt, ranch dressing seasoning, and chipotle peppers with adobo sauce—you have yourself a dip.

So, don’t see eating healthy as limiting. There are always ways to get around to your favorite dishes. You just have to find a few good recipes—or be like me with 19 cookbooks, six magazines, and the never-ending world wide web. 

Having My Cake and Eating It (But Only the Serving Size)

The goal has been achieved! After months of hard work by way of not stuffing my face every chance I got, I have reached my target weight. I’m down twenty-five pounds!  I know it may sound silly, but I worked hard for this by choosing wisely not only what to eat, but how much. I thumbed my way through a collection of cookbooks, magazines, and websites, making most of my meals at home. I also measured out everything—yes, everything. I can honestly say I’ve never been more dedicated to any cause. I’ve transformed my eating habits, lowered my weight, and improved how I feel about myself. 

October 2019 – 135 lbs
March 2019 – 160 lbs

This isn’t for everyone, I know. Most will say it’s too much work, or that they don’t like the restrictions. Well, it is a lot of work—at first, but then it becomes a daily habit. The same kind of habit we create when we have a bagel laden with strawberry cream cheese every morning with our Almond Joy Creamer and coffee. I’m not saying don’t have these things, but are you measuring out the cream cheese and creamer to the recommended serving size? This is the key to all of this weight loss—moderation.

Like I mentioned in my previous post, don’t say you’ve tried everything if you haven’t controlled your food intake. Yes, measuring out all the ingredients in a recipe and how much you serve yourself is a huge pain, but only at first. If it helps, I played a little mental trick to see if I could guess the weight of the food before weighing it. We all like to be right, don’t we? Absurd? Maybe, but I lost the weight I wanted.

When it comes to “restricting” myself, I did choose to remove most added sugars from my diet. Which wasn’t an issue as I really didn’t drink a lot of sodas, nor did I eat a lot of sweets overall. I had that slice of chocolate cake drizzled with caramel at a birthday celebration last month—I just had a smaller piece than I normally would have (and I did lick the plate). I did have delicious burgers with a soft, sweet Hawaiian buns, but I planned for it. In fact, I enjoyed everything I ate over the past three months. I controlled what and how much I consumed without the limitations of Keto, Paleo, or any of the other diet plans. And, I’m not vegan, vegetarian, or any other specific classification out there. I was smart with my choices.

I have been this weight before (years ago), but it isn’t the same. And, I don’t think I appreciated it as much. However, it’s more than the weight, it’s knowing that I’m healthier than I’ve ever been. When your daily intake of food consists of only fruits, vegetables, meats, and grains that I put together myself, how could it not be? I know what’s going in my food and I can pronounce every ingredient. We have eaten meals out as well, but put more thought into our choices. When the scale reflected those dinners out the next day, we didn’t sweat it because we knew we were on the right track overall.

The best part is that Michael and I are doing this together—which does make everything so much easier. It helps when you have a moment of weakness, don’t feel like measuring out all the ingredients, or even cooking for that matter! In the end, I am accountable to myself, but it helps he looks to me for motivation. He reached his goal too and gives me most of the credit as I make all our meals. He does help in the kitchen sometimes as he loves to use our fancy, new knife to chop, dice, and julienne. Michael also measures out our snacks and puts them into little baggies—nuts, wasabi peas, veggie puff-thingies, and whatever else that isn’t laden with sugar. 

yogajournal.com

I’d like to say my yoga exercise was a factor, but it really wasn’t. A few of weeks went by with no yoga after I strained an already hurt arm being ambitious with a pose. It was that backbend I did with ease when I was a wee younger—a million times—and was successful until the arm gave way. I’ve just gotten back into the grove, but still can’t do a lot of the poses as intended.

We do fit daily walks into our schedule, especially after dinner. Exercise and/or movement does need to happen in some form or fashion. It’s a great time for us to talk to each other without any distractions. I’m pretty sure we have a vacation planned out now.

All this to say, I did it. I promise you that I was the laziest of people when it came to healthy eating—not bad, but not smart. My weakness is Mexican food and I have found ways to keep enjoying it. In the end, it’s all a matter of what you’re willing to do. When you start seeing results, you’ll wonder why it took you so long. 

What Are You Putting In Your Mouth?

You know how we find something that interests us and become obsessed? We live and breathe it, no doubt annoying everyone with the constant monologuing and social media posts. We have become those people when it comes to what foods go into our daily diet. My Instagram feed is full of photos of our meals, and conveniently, Facebook duplicates them for that feed. Then there’s the commenting on every post that involves food, detailing why they aren’t good for you—making you ponder on whether or not to unfriend us. It’s a risk we take given our fascination with just how many people have it wrong about what’s healthy and how to knock off those extra pounds.

​”I’ve tried everything! I can’t lose the weight!”
Honesty, have you really?

“Dieting is too hard. I don’t want to be restricted.”
What about self-restraint on portion sizes?

“I don’t have the time to prepare healthy meals.”
Conservatively, you’re awake 16 hours in a day, are you sure?

“Healthy foods are too expensive.”
Are your medical fees and supplements cheaper?

There are so many more “reasons” people use for not eating better and I have a response to all of them.  If you avoid pretty much everything in the middle of the grocery store, you’d really be better off. All you have to do is control your ingredients…or, at least make better choices on those prepared foods. ​

We rejoice in the fact we feel better and that we’ve lost most of the inches grown over the past few years from all those bad food decisions. All it took was dishing out only the recommended serving sizes when we eat and cutting out as many added sugars as possible. There is a tendency to fill plates with even the healthiest of foods rather than thinking about quality over quantity.

Eating salads and snacking on granola bars isn’t exactly healthy if the salad is laden with dressing and the granola bar has added sugars. Here are two examples of salad dressing and a granola bar. Aside from the sugar added, there is a slew of ingredients most can’t pronounce. 

Ranch Dressing: Vegetable Oil, Water, Egg Yolks, Sugar, Salt, Cultured Nonfat Buttermilk, Natural Flavors, Spices, Dried Garlic, Dried Onion, Vinegar, Phosphoric Acid, Xanthan Gum, Modified Food Starch, Monosodium Glutamate, Artificial Flavors, Disodium Phosphate, Sorbic Acid and Calcium Disodium EDTA as Preservatives, Disodium Inosinate, Disodium Guanylate. Gluten free.

If you only use one serving size of two tablespoons, then it’s one-half teaspoon of sugar poured on your salad. 

Oats ’n Honey Granola Bar: Whole Grain Oats, Sugar, Canola Oil, Rice Flour, Honey, Salt, Brown Sugar Syrup, Baking Soda, Soy Lecithin, Natural Flavor.

If you only eat one serving size of two bars in a package, then it’s almost four teaspoons of sugar.​

​Let’s say you love ranch dressing and want to make it yourself. I’m pretty sure you can pronounce all of these: mayonnaise, sour cream, dried chives, dried parsley, dried dill weed, garlic powder, onion powder, salt, black pepper. Try this recipe for ranch dressing.

Need a snack, here’s what’s in the oats ’n honey granola bar you love so much: dates, honey, natural peanut or almond butter, almonds, rolled oats, and dried fruit. It may take a minute, but try using this recipe

Although honey is considered a sugar, it’s a natural one that offers nutrients and antioxidants. Pure Maple Syrup also falls into that category. Peanut butter containing ONLY peanuts is a good thing. Simply Jiff Peanut Butter has roasted peanuts, fully hydrogenated vegetable oils, mono and diglycerides, molassessugar, salt. Again, this is about trying to limit the intake of added sugars that your body doesn’t really know what to do with—and then eventually turns it into fat. 

I have no doubt all this is annoying to think about, but you should. And, this isn’t a “look at me and how great I’m doing” thing. It’s about wanting to share what we know to those we care about. The most common food-related things people post about are:

Sugar-laden Treats – photos of rich cakes, donuts, or various other sweets. Usually oversized.

Food photos – plates filled with delicious meals or monstrous-sized burgers, pizza, etc.

Diets/weight loss – Keto, Mediterranean, Paleo, etc.

Types of Diets
Abs
Acid Alkaline
Anti-Inflammatory
Atkins
Biggest Loser
Body Reset
DASH Diet
Dukan
Eco-Atkins
Engine 2
Fast
Fertility
Flat Belly
Flexitarian
Glycemic-Index
HMR
Jenny Craig
Macrobiotic
Mayo Clinic
Medifast
Mediterranean
MIND Diet
Nutrisystem
Ornish
Paleo
Raw food
Slim Fast
South Beach
SparkPeople
Supercharged Hormone
TLC Diet
Traditional Asian
Vegan
Vegetarian
Volumetrica
Weight Watchers
Whole
Zone

Let’s tackle the diet scene. I can’t even begin to count how emails I get about diets with the notion that this is the ONE for me. I’ve never been a “diet” fan and despise the notion of restrictions–creating menus without diversity. I started looking at some of these diets and learned some basics about each of them. For example:

The Keto Diet: This is the trending diet plan that has essentially replaced formerly popular Atkins. It’s a low carb, high fat claiming to offer many health benefits in addition to losing weight. You drastically reduce your carbs, replacing things such as:

Root vegetables – potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, etc.

Fruits – all except small amounts of berries.

Beans/Legumes – peas, lentils, chickpeas 

Types of things you can eat:

Meat – steak, ham, sausage, etc.

Cheese – unprocessed cheddar, mozzarella, goat, etc.

Low-carb Veggies – most greens, tomatoes, onions, peppers, etc.

Do you know how many vitamins and nutrients are in fruits? They are naturally low in fat, sodium, and calories. There’s a bonus, too…no cholesterol. They may have sugar, but it’s the good kind as it also has fiber—which helps blood cholesterol levels. There is no substitute for what they do for you—so, save your money on vitamins and special juices and embrace this type of carbs. 

The same applies to root vegetables. Sweet potatoes are laden with fiber, vitamin C and A, not to mention antioxidants. And, oh-my-god, don’t sprinkle brown sugar on your sweet potato—because…well…it’s a SWEET potato. By the way, garlic is a root vegetable—think on that one a while. Here’s a guide to help figure it all out.

When it comes to beans and legumes, I’m a selective fan. Nevertheless, I am a fan. So whether I’m eating pinto or black beans, I’m getting my amino acids, protein, antioxidants, iron, fiber, etc. Beans and legumes are good eats and better made fresh at home, but we all do what we “can.” 

Shall I go on? I can tell you’d like me to, so here a couple other diets I explored:

The Paleo Diet – This one advocates eating the same foods that your hunter-gatherer ancestors allegedly ate. The paleo diet consists of eating whole foods, fruits, vegetables, lean meats, nuts, and seeds. It restricts the consumption of processed foods, grains, sugar, and dairy, though some less restrictive versions allow for some dairy products like cheese. I will say a lot of our meals follow the paleo guidelines and I’m delighted with the recipes. Here’s a website I frequently use that has a ton of fabulous meals you can make. 

The Mediterranean Diet – This one advocates eating plenty of fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, tubers, whole grains, fish, seafood, and extra virgin olive oil.. Foods such as poultry, eggs, and dairy products are to be eaten in moderation—red meats are limited. It does restrict refined grains (white rice or flour), trans fats (frozen pizza/fast food), refined oils (vegetable/canola oil), processed meats, added sugar, and other highly processed foods. Again, a lot of great recipes to add to your menu without having to restrict your entire diet. 

There are literally hundreds of diets to choose from. I find the best way to choose one is to piece it together based on your needs. Don’t completely restrict yourself, but have self-control. There is no right or wrong, just moderation on your portion sizes and sugar intake. I’m not saying it’s easy. In fact, it’s one of the hardest things we’ve had to do.

We recently watched a documentary-style movie called FED UP.  It’s essentially how we (everyone) have been so wrong about food—in a humorous and informative fashion. The movie claims it will change how we eat and it was a real eye-opener for us. I highly recommend watching it and guarantee you’ll invariably start paying attention to nutrition labels on the foods you buy. The amount of added sugars in almost everything we buy at the grocery store—sans the produce and fresh meats—is overwhelming. The labels of low or fat free, healthy, low-carb, among others, is misleading the public on how much sugar is actually added.

Did you know there are about 56 different names for sugar? ​​​Food companies are finding new ways to add sugar by simply renaming them—sometimes making it seem like a healthy additive. It’s not, so pay attention.

I know our daughter is hating the changes we’ve made as we not only point out all the sugar and unhealthy ingredients in the foods she likes, but we don’t buy most of them anymore. We do get her a few of her favorites things, like Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup to make chocolate milk. However, she has to measure out only a serving size, which is one tablespoon. Her macaroni and cheese is now Annie’s, which has better ingredients than Kraft’s version. We understand she wants the quick and easy meals, not ingredients to make them. However, she also wants a better complexion and more energy to get through her day. The key is involving her in the menu and letting her go through the cookbooks to pick out what she wants to eat. Her school choices are awful and she sent us photos of the healthy foods to show why she won’t bother choosing them. It’s really no wonder kids select pizza, French fries, and hamburgers. And, it’s also no wonder that kids are developing Type II Diabetes and becoming obese. I’ll no doubt have to blog about that, too. In the mean time, I want to make sure she has good choices at home.

I will conclude by saying sorry, not sorry, should you still be reading this post. If just one person gets something from it and attempts to better their diet just a little, I’ve succeeded.  Meanwhile, I will relish in the fact I have lost twenty pounds since we started eating actual portion sizes and limiting added sugars. I will embrace having more energy and the feeling better throughout my day. I will be continue to be assertive with our daughter, not giving up on changing her view of healthier foods. I will persevere in my search for new ways to appreciate asparagus.

​ I will not, however—under any circumstances—find value grapefruit or papaya. They are the fruits of the devil.